Sauna and birch branches in Lapland
Photo by: Inka Hyvönen

The hottest saunas in Lapland

Steamy and soothing, the sauna is one of Finland’s proudest traditions. We’ve put together some of the best sauna experiences you can have in Finnish Lapland.

No wellness visit to Finland is complete without a trip to the sauna. We’ve gathered the most interesting sauna experiences in Lapland, from a traditional smoke sauna to the luxury sauna experience. Whichever you choose, enjoy the heat!

Smoke sauna

The smoke sauna at Kiilopää fell center in Inari-Saariselkä is like heaven after a day outdoors. The gentle heat relaxes the muscles and mind. A refreshing dip into the fell brook running next to the sauna is a must. The sauna is open to the public and is heated three times a week.

Smoke sauna in Lapland
Photo by: Sampsa Sulonen
Enjoying the smoke sauna at Kiilopää in Inari, Finland
Photo by: Inari-Saariselkä

A Sauna of Ice & Fire

The snow sauna at the Arctic SnowHotel may be Lapland’s coolest sauna. Despite the cold radiating from the walls made of solid snow, the temperature inside is still warm. A few ladles of water on the stove fills the sauna with steam, a sensation you won’t find in a regular wooden sauna. If it gets too warm, step outside for a few moments and enjoy the stars sparkling over Rovaniemi.

Inside the snow sauna at Arctic Snow Hotel in Rovaniemi, Finland
Photo by: Arctic SnowHotel & Glass Igloos
Blue skies over Arctic SnowHotel in Rovaniemi, Finland
Photo by: Arctic SnowHotel & Glass Igloos

Igloo sauna

The words igloo and sauna might seem like a contradiction, but Arctic Fox Igloos on the shores of Lake Ranuajärvi are made of glass and not snow. Spend an hour melting in the sauna and then retire to your bed. Without lifting your head from your pillow, you can watch the Milky Way and the Northern Lights compete for your attention.

Inside the luxurious Arctic Fox Igloos in Ranua, Finland
Photo by: Marko Junttila | Visit Ranua
The sauna inside the luxurious Arctic Fox Igloos in Ranua, Finland
Photo by: Marko Juntilla | Visit Ranua

Lakeside luxury

The lights of the Pyhä ski slopes glitter like stars in the distance. The hot tub bubbles keep you nice and warm, but occasionally the wind swoops across the lake at the foot of Sunday Morning Resort. Goosebumps spider down your neck. But you’re not concerned with the -20°C temperatures. The sauna, in all its steamy dreamlike glory, is only a few steps away.

Enjoying a warm hot tub on a cold night at Sunday Morning Resort in Pyhä, Finland
Photo by: Sunday Morning Resort
Inside the sauna at Sunday Morning Resort in Pyhä, Finland
Photo by: Sunday Morning Resort
An evening at the Sunday Morning Resort sauna in Pyhä, Finland
Photo by: Sunday Morning Resort
A bright winter day at the Sunday Morning Resort sauna in Pyhä, Finland
Photo by: Sunday Morning Resort

Sauna on the river

The sauna raft M/S Erkin Arkki carries you across the scenic waters of the Kemijoki and Ounasjoki rivers, which meet in the heart of Rovaniemi. You can bathe in the wood-heated sauna while the raft floats on the river. When you feel like cooling down, the skipper will stop, and the river is all yours for a refreshing swim under the Midnight Sun.

Erkki Arkki sauna boat in Lapland

Sauna in the wilderness

If hiking is your thing, you will find a lovely sauna in the heart of the UKK National Park in Inari-Saariselkä. In conjunction to the Luirojärvi open hut, (nicknamed the Luirojärvi Hilton), there is a wood-heated sauna where hikers take turns for a replenishing bath. A jump in the lake gives a nice contrast to the heat and an extra boost to tired legs.

Wilderness sauna in Lapland
Photo by: Pirjo Rautiainen

Sauna on the sea

The Bothnian Bay National Park, in the archipelago around the towns Kemi and Tornio, hide secret gems. The rental cabin on Vähä-Huituri island features a seaside sauna, and on Selkäsarvi island, there is a sauna open to the public. These islands can be reached either by boat or kayak. Remember to bring your own drinking water and food!

Sauna on the beach in Lapland
Photo by: Pekka Aho